MDOT

Could a Road Funding Boost be a Big Win for Transit too?

We’ve all heard it endlessly for the past year and longer: “Fix the damn roads!!” Governor Whitmer is committed to doing just that, with no dodges, slight-of-hand, or gimmicks. Fixing Michigan’s roads will cost $2.5 billion, so she’s proposed a 45-cent gas tax increase to achieve that, while also moving education funds back to education …

Could a Road Funding Boost be a Big Win for Transit too? Read More »

Could a Road Funding Boost be a Big Win for Transit too?

We’ve all heard it endlessly for the past year and longer: “Fix the damn roads!!” Governor Whitmer is committed to doing just that, with no dodges, slight-of-hand, or gimmicks. Fixing Michigan’s roads will cost $2.5 billion, so she’s proposed a 45-cent gas tax increase to achieve that, while also moving education funds back to education …

Could a Road Funding Boost be a Big Win for Transit too? Read More »

Tell MDOT to Fix I-94 but NOT Widen It

MDOT is seeking public input on their proposed $1.9 billion overhaul and widening of I-94 through midtown and the east side of Detroit, including redesigning the interchanges with I-96, M-10, and I-75.

You have an opportunity to share your opinions at a series of open-house style Public Meetings hosted by MDOT on Tuesday July 14 and Thursday July 16.

While TRU supports reconstruction of the old infrastructure including I-94, we and others have serious concerns about the project’s scope and magnitude of the project. We recommended critical changes:
1) No Expansion – no new travel lanes or service drives
2) Maintain and Improve Walkability, instead of removing 11 bridges!
3) Preserve Urban Fabric and Historic Buildings
4) Fully Evaluate Impacts and Alternatives – complete a “Supplemental EIS” and consider how transit could alleviate peak traffic on I-94.

New report shows I-94 widening not supported by data

A new national report identifies state plans to widen I-94 through Detroit as one of 11 examples of wasteful highway spending based on its outdated assumptions. The study finds that the $2.7 billion project is based upon old forecasts of traffic trends that have proven badly in error and calls for the state to reconsider the widening and reprioritize scarce transportation dollars elsewhere.

Numerous local stakeholders have spoken out in opposition to the widening project and continue to urge MDOT to drastically scale back the project to acknowledge decreased driving and better support local community needs.